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Black Knowledges/Black StrugglesEssays in Critical Epistemology$
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Jason R. Ambroise and Sabine Broeck

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781781381724

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781781381724.001.0001

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date: 17 May 2021

The Ceremony Found: Towards the Autopoetic Turn/Overturn, its Autonomy of Human Agency and Extraterritoriality of (Self-)Cognition1

The Ceremony Found: Towards the Autopoetic Turn/Overturn, its Autonomy of Human Agency and Extraterritoriality of (Self-)Cognition1

Chapter:
(p.184) 8 The Ceremony Found: Towards the Autopoetic Turn/Overturn, its Autonomy of Human Agency and Extraterritoriality of (Self-)Cognition1
Source:
Black Knowledges/Black Struggles
Author(s):

Sylvia Wynter

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781781381724.003.0008

This chapter revisits the 1984 essay ‘The Ceremony Must Be Found: After Humanism’. That essay proposes that the ‘finding of a ceremony’ able to come to terms with the issue of race in its late modern purely biocentric expression as Du Bois' ‘Color Line’, would require a kind of rupture or transformation analogous to that effected by Lay-humanist intellectuals at the end of the Western-European Middle Ages. It further argues that the emancipation of Black peoples from conceptual, institutional, and structural subjugation — as well as of humankind from the related imperilizing crises of global warming and climate change and overall ‘global problamatique’ — would require the formulation of a new definition of the human and correlated episteme that could make possible a now required extraterritorialized view of our (self-)cognition. On the basis of this new definition, it concludes that we as a species would be conceptually empowered to make an autopoetic turn towards the Second Emergence recognition of ourselves as a uniquely hybrid and third level of existence, and, thereby, become fully conscious, autonomous agents in the collective remaking of both ourselves and our planterily-extended societal order in the new ecumenically human, species-oriented terms now so desperately required for both our continued biological survival and unique and always genre-specific realization.

Keywords:   race, ceremony, Renaissance Lay-humanist intellectuals, Blacks, self-cognition

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