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Contemporary Encounters with Ancient Metaphysics$
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Abraham Jacob Greenstine and Ryan J. Johnson

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781474412094

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474412094.001.0001

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date: 05 June 2020

Diverging Ways: On the Trajectories of Ontology in Parmenides, Aristotle, and Deleuze

Diverging Ways: On the Trajectories of Ontology in Parmenides, Aristotle, and Deleuze

Chapter:
(p.202) Chapter 11 Diverging Ways: On the Trajectories of Ontology in Parmenides, Aristotle, and Deleuze
Source:
Contemporary Encounters with Ancient Metaphysics
Author(s):

Abraham Jacob Greenstine

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474412094.003.0011

Abraham Jacob Greenstine’s “Diverging Ways: On the Trajectories of Ontology in Parmenides, Aristotle, and Deleuze” asks what is ontology – how do we speak being? Starting from Deleuze’s claim that there is only one ontology, Greenstine successively interrogates the projects of Parmenides, Aristotle, and Deleuze. These three, in dialogue with one another, agree that there is some discourse on being, but disagree about its scope, method, and content. For Parmenides, ontology is a path to the truth, a narrative that leads us to attributes of being itself. For Aristotle, ontology is a knowledge of the first principles, an account that clarifies the many senses of being in order to recognize the divine cause of being itself. For Deleuze, ontology expresses only a single proposition, and being has but a single attribute: being is univocal. By contrasting these projects, Greenstine seeks to outline ontology as such.

Keywords:   Parmenides, Aristotle, Deleuze, Univocity, Principle, Truth, Being, Ontology

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