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African, American and European Trajectories of ModernityPast Oppression, Future Justice?$
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Peter Wagner

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781474400404

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474400404.001.0001

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date: 26 May 2020

HIV/AIDS Policies and Modernity in Brazil and South Africa: a Comparative Critical Analysis

HIV/AIDS Policies and Modernity in Brazil and South Africa: a Comparative Critical Analysis

Chapter:
(p.149) 7 HIV/AIDS Policies and Modernity in Brazil and South Africa: a Comparative Critical Analysis
Source:
African, American and European Trajectories of Modernity
Author(s):

José Katito

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474400404.003.0008

This chapter compares HIV/AIDS policies in Brazil and South Africa over the thirty-year history of the epidemic, focusing on the period between the mid-1980s and the early 2000s. The discussion lays emphasis on the largely divergent policy responses of the two states to the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The chapter begins with an overview of Brazil and South Africa's HIV/AIDS policies, along with critical factors that explain why, despite being two similar societies, they responded so differently to the epidemic. These factors include the nature and the timing of democratic transition and the relatively stronger Brazilian civil society. The chapter argues that Brazil acted far more aggressively than South Africa against the HIV/AIDS epidemic by implementing comprehensive prevention, treatment and care policies. As a result, the Brazilian government has been able to contain the spread of the virus across its population. In contrast, negligence, denial, delay and fragmentation have considerably exacerbated the HIV/AIDS epidemic in South Africa.

Keywords:   civil society, HIV policies, Brazil, South Africa, AIDS policies, democratic transition, prevention, treatment

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