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Blindsight: A Case Study and Implications

L. Weiskrantz

Published in print:
1990
Published Online:
January 2008
ISBN:
9780198521921
eISBN:
9780191706226
Item type:
book
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198521921.001.0001
Subject:
Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience

Damage to a particular area of the brain — the neocortex — is generally understood to result in blindness. Studies of some patients who have suffered from this form of blindness have nevertheless ... More


The natural blind-spot (optic disc) within the scotoma

L. Weiskrantz

in Blindsight: A Case Study and Implications

Published in print:
1990
Published Online:
January 2008
ISBN:
9780198521921
eISBN:
9780191706226
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198521921.003.0010
Subject:
Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience

The optic disc provides ready-made control for determining the limits of intra-ocular diffusion. As the size of the natural and absolutely blind area is fixed and known (5° × 7°), a target light that ... More


Status, issues, and implications

L. Weiskrantz

in Blindsight: A Case Study and Implications

Published in print:
1990
Published Online:
January 2008
ISBN:
9780198521921
eISBN:
9780191706226
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198521921.003.0019
Subject:
Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience

The chapter ranges broadly over a number of topics, and summarizes the empirical findings on D. B. of 1986. It discusses issues that arose when blindsight research first emerged. These include stray ... More


Reaching for randomly located targets

L. Weiskrantz

in Blindsight: A Case Study and Implications

Published in print:
1990
Published Online:
January 2008
ISBN:
9780198521921
eISBN:
9780191706226
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198521921.003.0003
Subject:
Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience

D. B. was instructed to reach for circular visual stimuli projected at various eccentricities onto a perimeter screen, usually along the horizontal meridian. A range of sizes and contrasts were ... More


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