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Crisis of Doubt: Honest Faith in Nineteenth-Century England

Timothy Larsen

Published in print:
2006
Published Online:
January 2007
ISBN:
9780199287871
eISBN:
9780191713422
Item type:
book
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199287871.001.0001
Subject:
Religion, Theology

For fifty years or more, a dominant motif in 19th-century British studies has been the Victorian crisis of faith or loss of faith. From Basil Willey to A. N. Wilson, books have been written that ... More


John Henry Gordon

Timothy Larsen

in Crisis of Doubt: Honest Faith in Nineteenth-Century England

Published in print:
2006
Published Online:
January 2007
ISBN:
9780199287871
eISBN:
9780191713422
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199287871.003.0005
Subject:
Religion, Theology

John Henry Gordon wrote for G. J. Holyoake’s Reasoner. Gordon became the first full-time Secularist lecturer in Britain when he was appointed by the Leeds Secular Society. After a dramatic ... More


John Bagnall Bebbington

Timothy Larsen

in Crisis of Doubt: Honest Faith in Nineteenth-Century England

Published in print:
2006
Published Online:
January 2007
ISBN:
9780199287871
eISBN:
9780191713422
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199287871.003.0007
Subject:
Religion, Theology

John Bagnall Bebbington, in addition to writing and lecturing in favour of Secularism, was also a patron of freethinking endeavours. He was the chairman of the Temple Secular Society and the editor ... More


How Many Reconverts Were There?

Timothy Larsen

in Crisis of Doubt: Honest Faith in Nineteenth-Century England

Published in print:
2006
Published Online:
January 2007
ISBN:
9780199287871
eISBN:
9780191713422
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199287871.003.0009
Subject:
Religion, Theology

This chapter argues that the crisis of doubt in the world of popular freethought was a deep one. A significant percentage of Secularist leaders reconverted.


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