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Brass Tacks in Linguistic Theory: Innate Grammatical Principles

Stephen Crain, Andrea Gualmini, and Paul Pietroski

in The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents

Published in print:
2005
Published Online:
January 2007
ISBN:
9780195179675
eISBN:
9780199869794
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195179675.003.0011
Subject:
Philosophy, Metaphysics/Epistemology

This chapter presents detailed empirical work on several aspects of children's linguistic performance, focusing in particular on evidence that even two-year-old children understand that the meanings ... More


Parameters, Performance, and the Explanation of Typological Generalizations

Frederick J. Newmeyer

in Possible and Probable Languages: A Generative Perspective on Linguistic Typology

Published in print:
2005
Published Online:
September 2007
ISBN:
9780199274338
eISBN:
9780191706479
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199274338.003.0003
Subject:
Linguistics, Language Families

This chapter launches a frontal assault not just on the parametric approach to grammar, but also on the very idea that it is the job of Universal Grammar (UG) per se to account for typological ... More


Possible and Probable Languages: A Generative Perspective on Linguistic Typology

Frederick J. Newmeyer

Published in print:
2005
Published Online:
September 2007
ISBN:
9780199274338
eISBN:
9780191706479
Item type:
book
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199274338.001.0001
Subject:
Linguistics, Language Families

This book takes on the question of language variety, addressing the question of why some language types are impossible and why some grammatical features are more common than others. The task of ... More


A Formal Model of Utterance Interpretation

LUTZ MARTEN

in At the Syntax-Pragmatics Interface: Verbal Underspecification and Concept Formation in Dynamic Syntax

Published in print:
2002
Published Online:
January 2010
ISBN:
9780199250639
eISBN:
9780191719479
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199250639.003.0002
Subject:
Linguistics, Semantics and Pragmatics, Syntax and Morphology

This chapter provides the theoretical background to the study. Based on the two major theories behind the analysis — Dynamic Syntax and Relevance Theory — it develops a formal model of utterance ... More


The Social Politics of Language Choice and Linguistic Correctness

John E. Joseph

in Language and Politics

Published in print:
2006
Published Online:
September 2012
ISBN:
9780748624522
eISBN:
9780748671458
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:
10.3366/edinburgh/9780748624522.003.0003
Subject:
Linguistics, Sociolinguistics / Anthropological Linguistics

This chapter is concerned with the question of the choices individuals make from among the ways of speaking available in their environment, with the focus on the political motivations and ... More


The Theory of Principles and Parameters

Howard Lasnik

in The Minimalist Program

Published in print:
2014
Published Online:
September 2015
ISBN:
9780262527347
eISBN:
9780262327282
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:
10.7551/mitpress/9780262527347.003.0001
Subject:
Linguistics, Theoretical Linguistics

This chapter discusses the kinds of work being pursued within the general principles-and-parameters model as well as some of the thinking that underlies and guides it. The theory of principles and ... More


Affect: Intensities and Energies in the Charismatic Language, Embodiment, and Genre of a North American Movement

Jon Bialecki

in The Anthropology of Global Pentecostalism and Evangelicalism

Published in print:
2015
Published Online:
May 2017
ISBN:
9780814772591
eISBN:
9780814723517
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:
10.18574/nyu/9780814772591.003.0005
Subject:
Anthropology, Anthropology, Religion

This chapter argues that by concentrating on affect, we can think about language and embodiment together without privileging either term. To demonstrate, the chapter draws on eight years of ... More


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