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The Cognitive Theory

Derek Matravers

in Art and Emotion

Published in print:
2001
Published Online:
October 2011
ISBN:
9780199243167
eISBN:
9780191697227
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243167.003.0007
Subject:
Philosophy, Aesthetics, Philosophy of Mind

There are two obvious candidates for an account of expressive judgements. Putting these candidates in their roughest and least plausible forms, the arousal theory claims that music is sad if it makes ... More


Defending the Arousal Theory

Derek Matravers

in Art and Emotion

Published in print:
2001
Published Online:
October 2011
ISBN:
9780199243167
eISBN:
9780191697227
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243167.003.0008
Subject:
Philosophy, Aesthetics, Philosophy of Mind

The experience of expression in art can be explained analogously to one's experience of the expression of emotion in people. The most important facet of the analogy between expressive music and ... More


Commentator

Malcolm Gillies, David Pear, and Mark Carroll

in Self-Portrait of Percy Grainger

Published in print:
2006
Published Online:
January 2010
ISBN:
9780195305371
eISBN:
9780199863624
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195305371.003.009
Subject:
Music, History, Western

This chapter presents a selection of Grainger's comments about music and musicians. It begins with a discussion of the expressive potential of music, and music's inability to address more than one ... More


A New Mainstream

David H. Rosenthal

in Hard Bop: Jazz and Black Music, 1955–1965

Published in print:
1994
Published Online:
October 2011
ISBN:
9780195085563
eISBN:
9780199853199
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195085563.003.0004
Subject:
Music, History, American

When jazz was divided in the 1950s between Traditional and Cool, “mainstream” became the collective term for all forms, united only by virtue of all jazz being expressive and swinging. These twin ... More


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