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Congenital and Acquired Prosopagnosia: Flip Sides of the Same Coin?

Marlene Behrmann, Galia Avidan, Cibu Thomas, and Kate Humphreys

in Perceptual Expertise: Bridging Brain and Behavior

Published in print:
2009
Published Online:
February 2010
ISBN:
9780195309607
eISBN:
9780199865291
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195309607.003.0007
Subject:
Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Vision

Both congenital prosopagnosia (CP) and acquired prosopagnosia (AP) are characterized by a deficit in recognizing faces, but the former is a failure to acquire face-processing skills in the absence of ... More


When is a Face Not a Face?: The Effects of Misorientation on Mechanisims of Face Perception

Janice E. Murray, Gillian Rhodes, and Maria Schuchinsky

in Perception of Faces, Objects, and Scenes: Analytic and Holistic Processes

Published in print:
2006
Published Online:
March 2012
ISBN:
9780195313659
eISBN:
9780199848058
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195313659.003.0004
Subject:
Psychology, Cognitive Psychology

Do large inversion effects for face recognition obtained with nonbrain-damaged participants require a dual route explanation? This chapter points out that impaired performance in an inverted ... More


Development of Expertise in Face Recognition

Catherine J. Mondloch, Richard Le Grand, and Daphne Maurer

in Perceptual Expertise: Bridging Brain and Behavior

Published in print:
2009
Published Online:
February 2010
ISBN:
9780195309607
eISBN:
9780199865291
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195309607.003.0004
Subject:
Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Vision

Newborn infants have a bias to look at faces, in particular the eye region. Whether this is due to an innate face template or is the result of more general visual preferences, this early bias ... More


The How, When, and Why of Configural Processing in the Perception of Human Movement

James C. Thompson

in People Watching: Social, Perceptual, and Neurophysiological Studies of Body Perception

Published in print:
2012
Published Online:
January 2013
ISBN:
9780195393705
eISBN:
9780199979271
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195393705.003.0018
Subject:
Psychology, Cognitive Psychology

While several different neural processes contribute to the perception of biological motion, the responsiveness of a key area, the human superior temporal sulcus (STS), to biological motion appears to ... More


Seeing You Through Me:: Creating Self–Other Correspondences for Body Perception

Catherine L. Reed

in People Watching: Social, Perceptual, and Neurophysiological Studies of Body Perception

Published in print:
2012
Published Online:
January 2013
ISBN:
9780195393705
eISBN:
9780199979271
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195393705.003.0004
Subject:
Psychology, Cognitive Psychology

The visual perception of the human body, whether static or in motion, appears to depend upon the observer’s own bodily representations, as well as on motor and kinesthetic mechanisms. For example, ... More


Isolating Holistic Processing in Faces (And Perhaps Objects)

Elinor Mckone, Paolo Martini, and Ken Nakayama

in Perception of Faces, Objects, and Scenes: Analytic and Holistic Processes

Published in print:
2006
Published Online:
March 2012
ISBN:
9780195313659
eISBN:
9780199848058
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195313659.003.0005
Subject:
Psychology, Cognitive Psychology

This chapter summarizes a series of techniques designed to isolate configural/holistic processes. This approach is built on the assumption that configural processes are holistic in that they sum ... More


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