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Introduction

Bettelou Los

in The Rise of the To-Infinitive

Published in print:
2005
Published Online:
September 2007
ISBN:
9780199274765
eISBN:
9780191705885
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199274765.003.0001
Subject:
Linguistics, Historical Linguistics

This chapter presents an overview of issues of the to-infinitive discussed in the literature. It is usually assumed that the infinitive is a noun in Old English, and that, hence, the to-infinitive is ... More


Summary and conclusions

Bettelou Los

in The Rise of the To-Infinitive

Published in print:
2005
Published Online:
September 2007
ISBN:
9780199274765
eISBN:
9780191705885
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199274765.003.0011
Subject:
Linguistics, Historical Linguistics

This final chapter wraps up the main conclusions of the book: the origin of the to-infinitive and its reanalysis as a non-finite subjunctive clause, and its rise and spread at the expense of the ... More


The Matter of the Soul’s Activities

Thomas Kjeller Johansen

in The Powers of Aristotle's Soul

Published in print:
2012
Published Online:
January 2013
ISBN:
9780199658435
eISBN:
9780191742231
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199658435.003.0009
Subject:
Philosophy, Ancient Philosophy, Philosophy of Mind

Aristotle's account of affections ‘common to body and soul’ suggests that the formal account of a psychological affection implies a specific account of the bodily side of this affection. This is ... More


The expression of purpose in Old English

Bettelou Los

in The Rise of the To-Infinitive

Published in print:
2005
Published Online:
September 2007
ISBN:
9780199274765
eISBN:
9780191705885
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199274765.003.0002
Subject:
Linguistics, Historical Linguistics

This chapter describes the earliest syntactic function of the to-infinitive: that of purpose adjunct, as in Present-day English, I left early to catch the train. Data from Gothic and Old English show ... More


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