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Adoption Averted in The Scarlet Letter

Carol J. Singley

in Adopting America: Childhood, Kinship, and National Identity in Literature

Published in print:
2011
Published Online:
May 2011
ISBN:
9780199779390
eISBN:
9780199895106
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199779390.003.0003
Subject:
Literature, American, 19th Century Literature

Nathaniel Hawthorne explores nonnormative kinship structures in The Scarlet Letter. Hester Prynne successfully defends her right to custody of her daughter, Pearl, when the Salem magistrates threaten ... More


Plotting Adoption in Nineteenth-Century Fiction

Carol J. Singley

in Adopting America: Childhood, Kinship, and National Identity in Literature

Published in print:
2011
Published Online:
May 2011
ISBN:
9780199779390
eISBN:
9780199895106
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199779390.003.0004
Subject:
Literature, American, 19th Century Literature

Adoption fiction flourished in the mid-nineteenth century, reflecting a new republican conception of family as a nonhierarchical grouping of individuals whose will to be together is as important as ... More


Mixed-Race Children and Their Korean Mothers

Susie Woo

in Framed by War: Korean Children and Women at the Crossroads of US Empire

Published in print:
2019
Published Online:
May 2020
ISBN:
9781479889914
eISBN:
9781479845712
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:
10.18574/nyu/9781479889914.003.0006
Subject:
Society and Culture, Asian Studies

This chapter looks at what happened to the Korean women and children who remained in South Korea. It sets the stage by describing how President Rhee’s 1953 directive to remove children with American ... More


Meetings’ Aftermaths

Elise Prébin

in Meeting Once More: The Korean Side of Transnational Adoption

Published in print:
2013
Published Online:
March 2016
ISBN:
9780814760260
eISBN:
9780814764961
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:
10.18574/nyu/9780814760260.003.0008
Subject:
Anthropology, Latin American Cultural Anthropology

This chapter presents ethnographies of first meetings between transnational adoptees and their birth families in South Korea via Ach'im madang, with particular emphasis on the outcomes of the family ... More


Servitude and Homelessness: Harriet Wilson’s Our Nig

Carol J. Singley

in Adopting America: Childhood, Kinship, and National Identity in Literature

Published in print:
2011
Published Online:
May 2011
ISBN:
9780199779390
eISBN:
9780199895106
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199779390.003.0006
Subject:
Literature, American, 19th Century Literature

Harriet Wilson’s Our Nig (1859) demonstrates the limits of adoption for a poor racially marked Northern child deemed unfit for the middle class. The mixed race Frado Smith is denied adoption after ... More


“I Wanted My Head to be Removed”: The Limits of Normativity

Soojin Pate

in From Orphan to Adoptee: U.S. Empire and Genealogies of Korean Adoption

Published in print:
2014
Published Online:
August 2015
ISBN:
9780816683055
eISBN:
9781452948980
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:
10.5749/minnesota/9780816683055.003.0006
Subject:
Sociology, Race and Ethnicity

This chapter articulates that the figure of the Korean adoptee—upon entrance into his or her new American family—documents the excesses, limits, and contradictions of Korean adoption as a project of ... More


The obstetric outcome of pregnant women with psychotic disorders

Louise M. Howard

in Title Pages

Published in print:
2014
Published Online:
November 2020
ISBN:
9780199676859
eISBN:
9780191918346
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/oso/9780199676859.003.0005
Subject:
Clinical Medicine and Allied Health, Psychiatry

In 1996, when I was working with Channi as a psychiatry trainee, we were both struck by how often we were seeing women with psychotic disorders in the ... More


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