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Scholarly Milton

Thomas Festa and Kevin J. Donovan (eds)

Published in print:
2019
Published Online:
May 2020
ISBN:
9781942954811
eISBN:
9781789623178
Item type:
book
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:
10.3828/liverpool/9781942954811.001.0001
Subject:
Literature, 18th-century Literature

A collection of original and previously unpublished essays concerned with the function of scholarship in both the invention and the reception of Milton’s writings in poetry and prose. Following the ... More


Revisiting Milton’s (Logical) God: Empson 2018

Emma Annette Wilson

in Scholarly Milton

Published in print:
2019
Published Online:
May 2020
ISBN:
9781942954811
eISBN:
9781789623178
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:
10.3828/liverpool/9781942954811.003.0007
Subject:
Literature, 18th-century Literature

Draws on Milton’s Artis Plenior Logicae (1672) to read the logic of his God, arguing “that the poem is good not primarily because it makes God either good or bad,” pace Empson, “but because it lays ... More


God’s Grammar: Milton’s Parsing of the Divine

Russell Hugh McConnell

in Scholarly Milton

Published in print:
2019
Published Online:
May 2020
ISBN:
9781942954811
eISBN:
9781789623178
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:
10.3828/liverpool/9781942954811.003.0008
Subject:
Literature, 18th-century Literature

Milton’s confidence in his powers of poetic sublimity seemingly falters when rendering divine speech. Evidently “in order to adequately discuss the transcendent quality of divinity, Milton’s grammar ... More


Raphael’s Peroratio in Paradise Lost Balancing Rhetorical Passion in Virgil and Paul

Joshua R. Held

in Scholarly Milton

Published in print:
2019
Published Online:
May 2020
ISBN:
9781942954811
eISBN:
9781789623178
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:
10.3828/liverpool/9781942954811.003.0009
Subject:
Literature, 18th-century Literature

Quintilian, Aristotle, and Cicero all comment on the peroration as an appropriate place to appeal most strongly to the passions or emotions of an audience. Mercury’s peroration in book 4 of the ... More


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