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Relocating Gender in Sikh History

Doris Jakobsch

Published in print:
2006
Published Online:
October 2012
ISBN:
9780195679199
eISBN:
9780199081950
Item type:
book
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195679199.001.0001
Subject:
Religion, Sikhism

This book charts the history of gender construction in Sikhism by focusing on the Singh Sabha Reform Movement spearheaded by British educated Sikhs in the late nineteenth and early twentieth ... More


Contextualizing Reform in Nineteenth-Century Punjab: Continuity and Change

Doris R. Jakobsh

in Relocating Gender in Sikh History

Published in print:
2006
Published Online:
October 2012
ISBN:
9780195679199
eISBN:
9780199081950
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195679199.003.0005
Subject:
Religion, Sikhism

This chapter investigates the roots and context of the Singh Sabha Reform Movement and its influence within the colonial context in Punjab. The author goes through describing the following: the ... More


Introduction

Doris R. Jakobsh

in Relocating Gender in Sikh History

Published in print:
2006
Published Online:
October 2012
ISBN:
9780195679199
eISBN:
9780199081950
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195679199.003.0001
Subject:
Religion, Sikhism

The Sikh tradition traces its origins to fifteenth-century Punjab in North India, the birthplace of Guru Nanak, born in 1469 CE. He was followed by nine gurus, of whom the last—Guru Gobind ... More


Of Colony and Gender: The Politics of Difference and Similarity

Doris R. Jakobsh

in Relocating Gender in Sikh History

Published in print:
2006
Published Online:
October 2012
ISBN:
9780195679199
eISBN:
9780199081950
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195679199.003.0004
Subject:
Religion, Sikhism

This chapter analyses how the hyper masculine ethos that underlay the institution of the Khalsa corresponded well with the sexual ethos prevailing in Victorian England. Victorian constructions of ... More


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