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The Birth of Tragedy, 1822–1897

in Knossos & the Prophets of Modernism

Published in print:
2009
Published Online:
March 2013
ISBN:
9780226289533
eISBN:
9780226289557
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:
10.7208/chicago/9780226289557.003.0002
Subject:
History, Cultural History

This chapter introduces the two great prophets of Minoan modernism, Friedrich Nietzsche and Heinrich Schliemann. It also investigates the way in which Nietzsche's heroic, aristocratic creed for a ... More


Moses as Epic Hero

Jeffrey Hart

in Smiling Through the Cultural Catastrophe: Toward the Revival of Higher Education

Published in print:
2001
Published Online:
October 2013
ISBN:
9780300087048
eISBN:
9780300130522
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:
10.12987/yale/9780300087048.003.0003
Subject:
Sociology, Education

This chapter considers Moses as a great epic hero, particularly a Bronze Age hero roughly contemporary with Achilles. The difference between Moses and Achilles, however, is that Moses's story cannot ... More


The Idea of Ethics

James Griffin

in What Can Philosophy Contribute To Ethics?

Published in print:
2015
Published Online:
December 2015
ISBN:
9780198748090
eISBN:
9780191813481
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198748090.003.0002
Subject:
Philosophy, Moral Philosophy

This chapter discusses the ethics of Homeric heroes, the Periclean gentlemen, Jews, medieval monks, the Enlightened, and present-day ethics. It describes how both the Homeric hero and the Periclean ... More


Reflection: Faculties and Self-Debate

Helene P. Foley

in The Faculties: A History

Published in print:
2015
Published Online:
May 2015
ISBN:
9780199935253
eISBN:
9780190247201
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199935253.003.0003
Subject:
Philosophy, History of Philosophy

This first Reflection looks at our faculty for self-debate from a classical perspective. It looks at the faculty of “heart” as observed in Homeric heroes and heroines. This faculty is located in the ... More


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