Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation

You are looking at 1-7 of 7 items

  • Keywords: Henry Maudsley x
Clear All Modify Search

View:

Love-Mad Women and the Rhetoric of Gentlemanly Medicine

Helen Small

in Love's Madness: Medicine, the Novel, and Female Insanity, 1800-1865

Published in print:
1998
Published Online:
October 2011
ISBN:
9780198184911
eISBN:
9780191674396
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198184911.003.0002
Subject:
Literature, 19th-century and Victorian Literature

John Mason Cox, John Conolly, Henry Maudsley, and Alexander Morison have had considerable influence on the way in which other disciplines, literary criticism, in this case, have thought about ... More


Childhood in Post-Darwinian Psychiatry

Shuttleworth Sally

in The Mind of the Child: Child Development in Literature, Science, and Medicine, 1840-1900

Published in print:
2010
Published Online:
October 2011
ISBN:
9780199582563
eISBN:
9780191702327
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199582563.003.0010
Subject:
Literature, 19th-century and Victorian Literature

This chapter examines discourses concerning child insanity in England during the 19th century. After Charles Darwin's publication of On the Origin of Species, the ideas of inheritance came to play an ... More


Affectivity in Mental Disorder: Maudsley

Jennifer Radden

in The Nature of Melancholy: From Aristotle to Kristeva

Published in print:
2002
Published Online:
October 2011
ISBN:
9780195151657
eISBN:
9780199849253
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195151657.003.0024
Subject:
Philosophy, General

This chapter presents Henry Maudsley's discussion of melancholy. Living between 1835 and 1918, Maudsley oversaw and greatly shaped the development of British psychiatry in this crucial period. In the ... More


Autobiography and the Science of Child Study

Shuttleworth Sally

in The Mind of the Child: Child Development in Literature, Science, and Medicine, 1840-1900

Published in print:
2010
Published Online:
October 2011
ISBN:
9780199582563
eISBN:
9780191702327
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199582563.003.0016
Subject:
Literature, 19th-century and Victorian Literature

This chapter examines British psychiatrist Henry Maudsley's criticism on the science of child study during the beginning of the 20th century. In his address to the 1900 meeting of the ... More


Introduction

Jane Wood

in Passion and Pathology in Victorian Fiction

Published in print:
2001
Published Online:
October 2011
ISBN:
9780198187608
eISBN:
9780191674723
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198187608.003.0001
Subject:
Literature, 19th-century and Victorian Literature

This book demonstrates medical arguments about the nature of the relationship between the physical, mental, and social aspects of men's and women's lives. Neurology is the branch of medicine that is ... More


Epilogue: Wildean Neuroaesthetics

Benjamin Morgan

in The Outward Mind: Materialist Aesthetics in Victorian Science and Literature

Published in print:
2017
Published Online:
September 2017
ISBN:
9780226442112
eISBN:
9780226457468
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:
10.7208/chicago/9780226457468.003.0007
Subject:
History, History of Science, Technology, and Medicine

The book’s epilogue discusses Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray as a novel that forecasts a revitalized contemporary interest in the aesthetic implications of what has recently been called the ... More


Idiocy and the Conceptual Economy of Madness

Murray K. Simpson

in Intellectual disability: A conceptual history, 1200-1900

Published in print:
2018
Published Online:
September 2018
ISBN:
9781526125316
eISBN:
9781526136213
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:
10.7228/manchester/9781526125316.003.0010
Subject:
History, Social History

The binary relationship between ‘intellectual disability’ and ‘mental illness’ is widely regarded as self-evident and long-established. This chapter demonstrates that the historical, and continuing, ... More


View: