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In the House of War: Dutch Islam Observed

Sam Cherribi

Published in print:
2010
Published Online:
September 2010
ISBN:
9780199734115
eISBN:
9780199866113
Item type:
book
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199734115.001.0001
Subject:
Religion, Islam

This book exposes the “trifecta of coercion”—the triple pressures of Muslim orthodoxy’s expectations for individuals, Dutch—and European, in general—expectations for immigrants, and the individual’s ... More


How Europe’s Secularism Became Contentious: Mosques, Imams, and Issues

Sam Cherribi

in In the House of War: Dutch Islam Observed

Published in print:
2010
Published Online:
September 2010
ISBN:
9780199734115
eISBN:
9780199866113
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199734115.003.0003
Subject:
Religion, Islam

This chapter examines the opinions of Islamic religious leaders based on a sample of 90 sermons in on contested social issues in Dutch mosques during the early 1990s. The chapter’s analytical ... More


Conclusion: The Vanishing Muslim Individual

Sam Cherribi

in In the House of War: Dutch Islam Observed

Published in print:
2010
Published Online:
September 2010
ISBN:
9780199734115
eISBN:
9780199866113
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199734115.003.0008
Subject:
Religion, Islam

The concluding chapter assumes that it is possible to dismantle the trifecta of coercion, and if we’re going to save the individuality that our rapidly developing world will so desperately need in ... More


What Does the Hajj Mean?

Robert R. Bianchi

in Guests of God: Pilgrimage and Politics in the Islamic World

Published in print:
2004
Published Online:
January 2005
ISBN:
9780195171075
eISBN:
9780199835102
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/0195171071.003.0003
Subject:
Religion, Islam

Modernist Islamic thinkers see the hajj as a treasure house of fluid symbols carrying infinite meanings everyone is free to interpret and reinterpret as they choose. In their view, “reading” the ... More


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