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Artha: Meaning

Jonardon Ganeri

Published in print:
2011
Published Online:
January 2013
ISBN:
9780198074137
eISBN:
9780199082131
Item type:
book
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198074137.001.0001
Subject:
Philosophy, General

This book covers śakti and artha, and specifically relates them to the significance of testimony and the epistemology of meaning in the Indian discussion. It pays attention to thinkers in the various ... More


The Ascendency of the Erotic

Tony K. Stewart

in The Final Word: The Caitanya Caritamrita and the Grammar of Religious Tradition

Published in print:
2010
Published Online:
May 2010
ISBN:
9780195392722
eISBN:
9780199777327
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195392722.003.0004
Subject:
Religion, Hinduism

Caitanya was recognized among Vaiṣṇavas of Nadīyā as Gaura, Golden One. Locana Dāsa’s Caitanya maṅgala told how devotees developed an overt affection labeled gaura nāgara bhāva, while local poets ... More


Heroic Shāktism: The Cult of Durgā in Ancient Indian Kingship

Bihani Sarkar

Published in print:
2017
Published Online:
May 2018
ISBN:
9780197266106
eISBN:
9780191865213
Item type:
book
Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:
10.5871/bacad/9780197266106.001.0001
Subject:
History, Indian History

This book tells the story of Durgā, the buffalo-demon-slaying deity dear to Indic rulers, between the 3rd and the 12th centuries CE, as she transformed from a Vaiṣṇava, to a Śaiva and finally to a ... More


Śakti: Meaning as a Relation

Jonardon Ganeri

in Artha: Meaning

Published in print:
2011
Published Online:
January 2013
ISBN:
9780198074137
eISBN:
9780199082131
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198074137.003.0002
Subject:
Philosophy, General

This chapter argues that Indian philosophers of language came to see that the referentialist interpretation is inconsistent with the realist theory of meaning, and explores the consequences of that ... More


Controversies and the Goddess

Rachel Fell McDermott

in Revelry, Rivalry, and Longing for the Goddesses of Bengal: The Fortunes of Hindu Festivals

Published in print:
2011
Published Online:
November 2015
ISBN:
9780231129190
eISBN:
9780231527873
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:
10.7312/columbia/9780231129190.003.0008
Subject:
Religion, Hinduism

This chapter looks at three controversial aspects of the Śākta Pūjās: the reaction by prostitutes to the injunction to offer earth from their doorposts to Durgā in her ritual, the impact of ... More


Channelizing Feminine Energy through Representations of Goddess(es)

Jaya Tyagi

in Contestation and Compliance: Retrieving Women's 'Agency' from Puranic Traditions

Published in print:
2014
Published Online:
November 2014
ISBN:
9780199451821
eISBN:
9780199084593
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199451821.003.0005
Subject:
History, Social History

The chapter explains why there is need to study the goddess tradition in the Puranic texts as they reveal the manner in which gender ideology extends to perceptions related to the ‘divine feminine’. ... More


Conclusions: Schopenhauer’s Will and Comparable Indian Ideas

Stephen Cross

in Schopenhauer's Encounter with Indian Thought: Representation and Will and Their Indian Parallels

Published in print:
2013
Published Online:
November 2016
ISBN:
9780824837358
eISBN:
9780824871048
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:
10.21313/hawaii/9780824837358.003.0013
Subject:
Society and Culture, Asian Studies

This chapter examines Arthur Schopenhauer’s doctrine of the will and its affinities with Indian philosophical ideas. It begins with a discussion of the arguments advanced by Schopenhauer and the ... More


Cosmological, Devotional, and Social Perspectives on the Hindu Goddess

Tracy Pintchman

in The Oxford History of Hinduism: The Goddess

Published in print:
2018
Published Online:
July 2018
ISBN:
9780198767022
eISBN:
9780191821226
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/oso/9780198767022.003.0002
Subject:
Religion, Hinduism, World Religions

Although Hindus recognize and revere a variety of different, discrete goddesses, they also tend to speak of “The Goddess” as a singular and unifying deity. This chapter focuses on three dimensions of ... More


Śrī/Lakṣmī: Goddess of Plenitude and Ideal of Womanhood

Mandakranta Bose

in The Oxford History of Hinduism: The Goddess

Published in print:
2018
Published Online:
July 2018
ISBN:
9780198767022
eISBN:
9780191821226
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/oso/9780198767022.003.0005
Subject:
Religion, Hinduism, World Religions

Goddess Lakṣmī, also called Śrī in early texts, is a goddess not only worshiped by Hindus as the source of wealth, domestic stability, and Viṣṇu’s beloved consort, but also venerated as an exemplar ... More


Here Are the Daughters: Reclaiming the Girl Child (Kanyā, Bālā, Kumārī) in the Empowering Tales and Rituals of Śākta Tantra

Madhu Khanna

in The Oxford History of Hinduism: The Goddess

Published in print:
2018
Published Online:
July 2018
ISBN:
9780198767022
eISBN:
9780191821226
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/oso/9780198767022.003.0009
Subject:
Religion, Hinduism, World Religions

This chapter is an attempt to uncover the absent legacy of the deified child goddesses—the virginal maidens as mothers, daughters, sisters designated as kanyās, bālās, and kumārīs—and their empowered ... More


The Cult of Relics in Hinduism

Orianne Aymard

in When a Goddess Dies: Worshipping Ma Anandamayi after Her Death

Published in print:
2014
Published Online:
June 2014
ISBN:
9780199368617
eISBN:
9780199368648
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199368617.003.0003
Subject:
Religion, Hinduism

Similarly to the Buddhist, Christian, or Sufi traditions, which confer upon the relic the power of the deceased saint, the relic in the Hindu tradition is viewed as a truly living entity. In ... More


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