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Ethics: and "The Nature of Moral Philosophy"

G. E. Moore

William H. Shaw (ed.)

Published in print:
2005
Published Online:
February 2006
ISBN:
9780199272013
eISBN:
9780191603181
Item type:
book
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/0199272018.001.0001
Subject:
Philosophy, History of Philosophy

This book is a new edition of G.E. Moore’s Ethics, originally published in 1912. In it, Moore analyzes the utilitarian account of right and wrong in great detail, defending the doctrine that results ... More


Utilitarianism

G. E. Moore

in Ethics: and "The Nature of Moral Philosophy"

Published in print:
2005
Published Online:
February 2006
ISBN:
9780199272013
eISBN:
9780191603181
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/0199272018.003.0001
Subject:
Philosophy, History of Philosophy

This chapter and the one that follows analyze and elucidate the normative structure of utilitarianism. Although Moore did not consider himself a utilitarian, it becomes evident as the book proceeds ... More


The Objectivity of Moral Judgements

G. E. Moore

in Ethics: and "The Nature of Moral Philosophy"

Published in print:
2005
Published Online:
February 2006
ISBN:
9780199272013
eISBN:
9780191603181
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/0199272018.003.0003
Subject:
Philosophy, History of Philosophy

Moore maintains that, in principle, there is an objective answer to questions of right and wrong. More specifically, that a particular action cannot be both right and wrong, either at the same time ... More


Free Will

G. E. Moore

in Ethics: and "The Nature of Moral Philosophy"

Published in print:
2005
Published Online:
February 2006
ISBN:
9780199272013
eISBN:
9780191603181
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/0199272018.003.0006
Subject:
Philosophy, History of Philosophy

This chapter is Moore’s most important discussion of the subject of free will. He distinguishes the question of whether right and wrong depend not on what we can do if we choose, but rather on what ... More


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