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Humility and Epistemic Goods

Robert C. Roberts and W. Jay Wood

in Intellectual Virtue: Perspectives from Ethics and Epistemology

Published in print:
2003
Published Online:
September 2010
ISBN:
9780199252732
eISBN:
9780191719288
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199252732.003.0012
Subject:
Philosophy, Moral Philosophy, Metaphysics/Epistemology

Some of the most interesting works in virtue ethics are the detailed, perceptive treatments of specific virtues and vices. This chapter aims to develop such work as it relates to intellectual virtues ... More


Intellectual Virtue: Perspectives from Ethics and Epistemology

Michael DePaul and Linda Zagzebski (eds)

Published in print:
2003
Published Online:
September 2010
ISBN:
9780199252732
eISBN:
9780191719288
Item type:
book
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199252732.001.0001
Subject:
Philosophy, Moral Philosophy, Metaphysics/Epistemology

Virtues have always been vital to the work of ethicists, but only recently have been analyzed and employed by epistemologists. By shifting the loci of analyses from properties of beliefs to ... More


Introduction

Linda Zagzebski and Michael DePaul (eds)

in Intellectual Virtue: Perspectives from Ethics and Epistemology

Published in print:
2003
Published Online:
September 2010
ISBN:
9780199252732
eISBN:
9780191719288
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199252732.003.0001
Subject:
Philosophy, Moral Philosophy, Metaphysics/Epistemology

It is high time for both ethicists and epistemologists to directly engage with each other. By bringing together each discipline's knowledge and perspective, relative to understanding the nature of ... More


Evidentialism, Vice, and Virtue

Jason Baehr

in The Inquiring Mind: On Intellectual Virtues and Virtue Epistemology

Published in print:
2011
Published Online:
September 2011
ISBN:
9780199604074
eISBN:
9780191729300
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199604074.003.0005
Subject:
Philosophy, Philosophy of Mind

This chapter argues that the concept of intellectual virtue also merits a secondary or background role in connection with evidentialist accounts of epistemic justification. According to these ... More


Autonomy as Intellectual Virtue

Kyla Ebels-Duggan

in The Aims of Higher Education: Problems of Morality and Justice

Published in print:
2015
Published Online:
January 2016
ISBN:
9780226259345
eISBN:
9780226259512
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:
10.7208/chicago/9780226259512.003.0005
Subject:
Education, Higher Education

One standard argument in support of higher education is that it is valuable because it promotes students’ autonomy, where ‘autonomy’ is roughly understood to be self-reliance and self-empowerment. ... More


The Solution: Doxastic Influence and Intellectual Obligations

Rik Peels

in Responsible Belief: A Theory in Ethics and Epistemology

Published in print:
2017
Published Online:
November 2016
ISBN:
9780190608118
eISBN:
9780190608132
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190608118.003.0004
Subject:
Philosophy, Metaphysics/Epistemology, Philosophy of Religion

The assessment of the four attempts to solve the problem of doxastic involuntarism in chapter 2 leaves only one option, namely to explain doxastic responsibility in terms of influence. On this ... More


Truthfulness

Byron Williston

in The Anthropocene Project: Virtue in the Age of Climate Change

Published in print:
2015
Published Online:
October 2015
ISBN:
9780198746713
eISBN:
9780191808975
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198746713.003.0005
Subject:
Political Science, Environmental Politics

The chapter begins by arguing that we need the explanatory tool of the intellectual virtues and vices to make full sense of what has gone wrong with our beliefs about climate change. The first job is ... More


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