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Death and survival in the nervous system

James W. Fawcett, Anne E. Rosser, and Stephen B. Dunnett

in Brain Damage, Brain Repair

Published in print:
2002
Published Online:
March 2012
ISBN:
9780198523376
eISBN:
9780191724534
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198523376.003.0001
Subject:
Neuroscience, Techniques

It is only in recent years that we have come to realise how important is the part played by cell death in the development, homeostasis, and injury responses of the nervous system. During development ... More


Metabolic damage

James W. Fawcett, Anne E. Rosser, and Stephen B. Dunnett

in Brain Damage, Brain Repair

Published in print:
2002
Published Online:
March 2012
ISBN:
9780198523376
eISBN:
9780191724534
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198523376.003.0003
Subject:
Neuroscience, Techniques

Many conditions can cause metabolic damage to the CNS, and they do so through a variety of mechanisms. Stroke, for instance, causes anoxic damage to a region of the brain, the actual cell death being ... More


Neuroprotection

James W. Fawcett, Anne E. Rosser, and Stephen B. Dunnett

in Brain Damage, Brain Repair

Published in print:
2002
Published Online:
March 2012
ISBN:
9780198523376
eISBN:
9780191724534
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198523376.003.0007
Subject:
Neuroscience, Techniques

Excitoxic damage, metabolic imbalance, oxidative stress, and calcium influx are each capable of inducing cell death by both necrotic and apoptotic mechanisms. If these various mechanisms contribute, ... More


Trophic factors

James W. Fawcett, Anne E. Rosser, and Stephen B. Dunnett

in Brain Damage, Brain Repair

Published in print:
2002
Published Online:
March 2012
ISBN:
9780198523376
eISBN:
9780191724534
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198523376.003.0009
Subject:
Neuroscience, Techniques

The developing nervous system produces about twice as many neurons as will survive into adulthood, and then at the end of development, around the time of birth in mammals, there is a short period ... More


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