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Homer’s Audience: What Did They See?

Annie Schnapp-Gourbeillon

in The Archaeology of Greece and Rome: Studies in Honour of Anthony Snodgrass

Published in print:
2016
Published Online:
May 2018
ISBN:
9781474417099
eISBN:
9781474426688
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:
10.3366/edinburgh/9781474417099.003.0005
Subject:
Classical Studies, Ancient Greek, Roman, and Early Christian Philosophy

At his weekly seminar, Jean-Pierre Vernant used to begin his answer to a friend’s or a colleague’s question with these words: ‘écoute voir’, which could be translated as: ‘listen to see’. Of course, ... More


Constructing Bridges for Peace and Tolerance: Ancient Greek Drama on the Israeli Stage

Nurit Yaari

in Classics in the Modern World: A Democratic Turn?

Published in print:
2013
Published Online:
January 2014
ISBN:
9780199673926
eISBN:
9780191760570
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199673926.003.0017
Subject:
Classical Studies, Ancient Greek, Roman, and Early Christian Philosophy, Literary Studies: Classical, Early, and Medieval

At the heart of this chapter is the assertion that the term ‘democratic turn’ makes it possible to identify an important component in the reception of classical Greek drama in Israeli theatre since ... More


Virgil’s Aeneid

Jon Stewart

in The Emergence of Subjectivity in the Ancient and Medieval World: An Interpretation of Western Civilization

Published in print:
2020
Published Online:
February 2020
ISBN:
9780198854357
eISBN:
9780191888632
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/oso/9780198854357.003.0010
Subject:
Classical Studies, Ancient Greek, Roman, and Early Christian Philosophy

Chapter 9 begins by introducing Virgil as an epic poet in the tradition of Homer. An account is given of Virgil’s goal to provide Rome with a great national epic during the time of Augustus Caesar. ... More


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