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Difference as Strategy in International Indigenous Peoples’ Movements

Jodi Melamed

in Represent and Destroy: Rationalizing Violence in the New Racial Capitalism

Published in print:
2011
Published Online:
August 2015
ISBN:
9780816674244
eISBN:
9781452947426
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:
10.5749/minnesota/9780816674244.003.0005
Subject:
Sociology, Race and Ethnicity

This chapter discusses global resource wars and the movement of indigenous people against such wars. Global resource wars are the forceful privatization and commodification of land, resources, goods ... More


Landscapes of Desire: Melancholy, Memory, and Fantasy in Deborah Miranda’s The Zen of La Llorona

Mark Rifkin

in The Erotics of Sovereignty: Queer Native Writing in the Era of Self-Determination

Published in print:
2012
Published Online:
August 2015
ISBN:
9780816677825
eISBN:
9781452948041
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:
10.5749/minnesota/9780816677825.003.0003
Subject:
Society and Culture, Native American Studies

In 1978, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) adopted a set of procedures to recognize Native peoples as tribes for the purposes of inclusion within the regulations and protections of federal Indian ... More


The Countercultural “Indian”: Visualizing Retribalization at the Human Be-in

Mark Watson

in West of Center: Art and the Counterculture Experiment in America, 1965-1977

Published in print:
2012
Published Online:
August 2015
ISBN:
9780816677252
eISBN:
9781452947440
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:
10.5749/minnesota/9780816677252.003.0012
Subject:
Art, Art History

This chapter discusses how the 1960s counterculture appropriated fragments of Native American cultural tradition, through citations of “Indian-ness,” to fashion what they called a “community of the ... More


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