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The Ghost Story, 1840–1920A Cultural History$
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Andrew Smith

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780719074462

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719074462.001.0001

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date: 14 December 2017

Haunted houses and history: Henry James’s Anglo-American ghosts

Haunted houses and history: Henry James’s Anglo-American ghosts

Chapter:
(p.120) 6 Haunted houses and history: Henry James’s Anglo-American ghosts
Source:
The Ghost Story, 1840–1920
Author(s):

Andrew Smith

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719074462.003.0007

This chapter investigates how representations of spectrality reformulate a model of national identity in Henry James. It shows that readings of haunted houses and hotels in several of James's works reveal how the historicity of the spectral expresses a nationally liminal Anglo-American identity politics. It also notes that a persistent theme of money and spectrality exists, which is familiar from Dickens, Riddell and Collins, and relates to conceptions of economic and national power and powerlessness.

Keywords:   representations, spectrality, national identity, Henry James, haunted houses, historicity, Anglo-American identity, money, power, powerlessness

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