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The Blair SupremacyA study in the politics of Labour's party management$
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Lewis Minkin

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780719073793

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719073793.001.0001

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date: 14 December 2017

Evaluation and perspectives

Evaluation and perspectives

Chapter:
(p.707) 20 Evaluation and perspectives
Source:
The Blair Supremacy
Author(s):

Lewis Minkin

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719073793.003.0021

This chapter evaluates Blair’s form of management in relation to the goals covered in Chapter 4 and a realist’s view of its controlling organisational successes. It is argued here that these successes, although considerable, obscure the problems of this form of management involving a variety of faulty judgments, a propensity to self-deceit, and a partial blindness to collateral and consequential damage. It shows this management to be a threat to party cohesion, a major generator of costly pervasive distrust and an encouragement to the very conservatism that ‘New Labour’ sought to overcome. In operation it undermined organisational vitality and grass roots electoral capacity. It was also very costly in terms of the party’s ethical renewal, its reputation and its contribution to confidence in politicians and British political life.

Keywords:   Problems of the management, Faulty judgments, Collateral and consequential damage, Cohesion and potential damage, Management as ally of conservatism, Undermining of organisational vitality and electoral capacity, Damage to ethical renewal, Reputation of politicians and British political life

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