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The Miles Davis Lost Quintet and Other Revolutionary Ensembles$
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Bob Gluck

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226180762

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226303390.001.0001

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date: 14 December 2017

Miles Davis’s Increasingly Electronic 1970, and a Reflection on His 1971–75 Bands

Miles Davis’s Increasingly Electronic 1970, and a Reflection on His 1971–75 Bands

Chapter:
5 Miles Davis’s Increasingly Electronic 1970, and a Reflection on His 1971–75 Bands
Source:
The Miles Davis Lost Quintet and Other Revolutionary Ensembles
Author(s):

Bob Gluck

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226303390.003.0006

Miles Davis’s desire for a more electric sound led the Fender Rhodes electric piano to become Chick Corea’s instrument in the “Lost” Quintet. Its greater volume and potential to create a wider range of sounds (with electronic processing) attracted Corea’s interest, although he remained ambivalent. Newly available synthesizers represent an interesting sonic parallel. The band’s sonic palate grew with the addition of percussionist Airto Moreira, bassist Dave Holland’s use of wah-wah electric bass, and finally Keith Jarrett’s arrival as a second electric keyboardist in April 1970. This electric aesthetic is exemplified in performances of “Bitches Brew” during the “Lost” band’s final months. In autumn 1970, the Davis band changed personnel with the departure of Corea and Holland, heading in a more funk-oriented direction, but one that never ceased to retain an air of experimentalism and surprise.

Keywords:   Miles Davis, jazz, Chick Corea, Dave Holland, Jack DeJohnette, Wayne Shorter, Steve Grossman, Gary Bartz, jazz fusion

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