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Virginia Woolf: Writing the World$
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Pamela L. Caughie and Diana L. Swanson

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780990895800

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9780990895800.001.0001

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date: 13 December 2017

The Reconciliations of Poetry in Virginia Woolf’s Between the Acts; or, Why it’s “perfectly ridiculous to call it a novel”

The Reconciliations of Poetry in Virginia Woolf’s Between the Acts; or, Why it’s “perfectly ridiculous to call it a novel”

Chapter:
(p.191) The Reconciliations of Poetry in Virginia Woolf’s Between the Acts; or, Why it’s “perfectly ridiculous to call it a novel”
Source:
Virginia Woolf: Writing the World
Author(s):

Amy Kahrmann Huseby

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780990895800.003.0027

This paper focuses on Virginia Woolf’s developing attitude toward the relationship between poetry and prose. This essay attempts to demonstrate one of the ways that we can trace the development of an author’s generic project, in this case through identifying a moment of intellectual genesis in which Woolf began to formulate how poetry would inflect her work. Taking Woolf’s essay “Impassioned Prose” and her novel Between the Acts as case studies, this essay considers poetry’s impact on the development of Woolf’s style. The term “euphonic prose” is proposed for Woolf’s books in place of the “novel,” a term Woolf herself famously found wanting. More broadly, the implication of Woolf’s hybrid poetic prose method is that the modern novel was not only born of an appreciation for the possibilities afforded by poetic forms but that the reconciliation of prose and poetry reached fruition in Woolf’s texts.

Keywords:   Virginia Woolf, Impassioned Prose, Between the Acts, Poetry, Prose, Euphonic prose, Modern novel, Alliteration

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