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Loyalty and LibertyAmerican Countersubversion from World War I to the McCarthy Era$
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Alex Goodall

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252038037

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252038037.001.0001

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date: 13 December 2017

War and Peace

War and Peace

Anti-Bolshevism at Home and Abroad

Chapter:
(p.35) 2 War and Peace
Source:
Loyalty and Liberty
Author(s):

Alex Goodall

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252038037.003.0003

This chapter explores how countersubversion may have been invigorated by the war, but it did not end with the Armistice. Like many other actions of 1919, the raid on the Information Bureau showed how loyalty enforcement persisted after the conflict ended, with international Bolshevism coming to replace the former German enemy in the public imagination. However, in deference to America's conception of itself as a nation of reason, subject to the rule of law, postwar anti-Bolshevik crusading was defended by its authors as a rigorous, objective, and empirical investigation of radical influence in America. Bolshevism was criticized because of its un-American limits on freedoms of speech, liberty, property, and religion and its contempt for law and order.

Keywords:   countersubversion, Armistice, Information Bureau, loyalty enforcement, Bolshevism, anti-Bolshevik crusading, un-American

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