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Religion, Art, and MoneyEpiscopalians and American Culture from the Civil War to the Great Depression$
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Peter W. Williams

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781469626970

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469626970.001.0001

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date: 19 August 2017

The Social Gospel

The Social Gospel

Chapter:
(p.117) Chapter Four The Social Gospel
Source:
Religion, Art, and Money
Author(s):

Peter W. Williams

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469626970.003.0005

Within the Episcopal Church—unlike some other denominations—there was considerable room for argument on matters of social and economic issues as well as those of “churchmanship.” During this era, many Episcopalians, both clergy and laity, remained attached to the laissez-faire economics that had dominated American thought during much of the nineteenth century. Others, however, grew highly critical of this economic system in the American social and political context. Many Episcopal parishes became pioneers in the institutional church movement, devising a whole new mixture of physical plant and programming that could provide a wide variety of services to poorer parishioners. Although many of their ideas and practices were shared with other denominations and secular agencies, Episcopalian “Social Gospellers” often differed from their counterparts in their association with the thought and experience of the Church of England, with which American Anglicans maintained a lively relationship during this era.

Keywords:   institutional church, Social Gospel, laissez-fair economics, Anglo-Catholicism, Church Association for the Advancement of Labor

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