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Introduction to Modeling Convection in Planets and StarsMagnetic Field, Density Stratification, Rotation$
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Gary A. Glatzmaier

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780691141725

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691141725.001.0001

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date: 13 December 2017

Boundaries and Geometries

Boundaries and Geometries

Chapter:
Chapter Ten Boundaries and Geometries
Source:
Introduction to Modeling Convection in Planets and Stars
Author(s):

Gary A. Glatzmaier

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691141725.003.0010

This chapter examines how boundary and geometry affect convection. It begins with a discussion of how one can implement “absorbing” top and bottom boundaries, which reduce the large-amplitude convectively driven flows within shallow boundary layers or the reflection of internal gravity waves off these boundaries in a stable stratification. It then considers how to replace the impermeable side boundary conditions with permeable periodic side boundary conditions to allow fluid flow through these boundaries and nonzero mean flow. It also introduces “two and a half dimensional” geometry within a cartesian box geometry and describes how a fully 3D cartesian box model could be constructed. Finally, it presents a model of convection in a fully 3D spherical-shell and shows how it can be easily reduced to a 2.5D spherical-shell model. The horizontal structures are represented in terms of spherical harmonic expansions.

Keywords:   convection, boundary layers, internal gravity waves, boundary conditions, fluid flow, cartesian box geometry, 3D spherical-shell, 2.5D spherical-shell, spherical harmonic expansions, 3D cartesian box

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