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Introduction to Modeling Convection in Planets and StarsMagnetic Field, Density Stratification, Rotation$
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Gary A. Glatzmaier

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780691141725

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691141725.001.0001

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date: 14 December 2017

Spatial Discretizations

Spatial Discretizations

Chapter:
Chapter Nine Spatial Discretizations
Source:
Introduction to Modeling Convection in Planets and Stars
Author(s):

Gary A. Glatzmaier

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691141725.003.0009

This chapter considers two ways of employing a spatial resolution that varies with position within a finite-difference method: using a nonuniform grid and mapping to a new coordinate variable. It first provides an overview of nonuniform grids before discussing coordinate mapping as an alternative way of achieving spatial discretization. It then describes an approach for treating both the vertical and horizontal directions with simple finite-difference methods: defining a streamfunction, which automatically satisfies mass conservation, and solving for vorticity via the curl of the momentum conservation equation. It also explains the use of the Chebyshev–Fourier method to simulate the convection or gravity wave problem by employing spectral methods in both the horizontal and vertical directions. Finally, it looks at the basic ideas and some issues that need to be addressed with respect to parallel processing as well as choices that need to be made when designing a parallel code.

Keywords:   spatial resolution, finite-difference method, nonuniform grid, coordinate mapping, spatial discretization, Chebyshev–Fourier method, convection, spectral method, parallel processing, parallel code

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