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The International Human Rights MovementA History$
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Aryeh Neier

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780691135151

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691135151.001.0001

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date: 13 December 2017

Rights on the Other Side of the Cold War Divide

Rights on the Other Side of the Cold War Divide

Chapter:
(p.161) 7 Rights on the Other Side of the Cold War Divide
Source:
The International Human Rights Movement
Author(s):

Aryeh Neier

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691135151.003.0007

This chapter illustrates that many Americans took part in struggles for rights during the period from the mid-1950s to the mid-1970s. Though it was a fertile period for those promoting rights within the United States, few Americans were concerned in those years with efforts to secure rights in other parts of the world. The emergence of a rights movement in the Soviet Union in the 1960s was little noted, and relatively few in the United States joined Amnesty International, which developed far more rapidly in Europe. Americans concerned about rights in that era could be mobilized to deal with American violations of rights, but not with rights abuses by other governments. Inattention to such matters by those deeply engaged in domestic rights struggles was, in a way, a counterpart to the disdain for international law frequently expressed by partisans of American exceptionalism.

Keywords:   rights movement, Americans, Soviet Union, Amnesty International, domestic rights, international law, American exceptionalism

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