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Beyond Ainu Studies
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Beyond Ainu Studies: Changing Academic and Public Perspectives

Mark J. Hudson, Ann-Elise Lewallen, and Mark K. Watson

Abstract

In 2008, 140 years after it had annexed Ainu lands, the Japanese government shocked observers by finally recognizing Ainu as an Indigenous people. In this moment of unparalleled political change, it was Uzawa Kanako, a young Ainu activist, who signaled the necessity of moving beyond the historical legacy of “Ainu studies.” Mired in a colonial mindset of abject academic practices, Ainu Studies was an umbrella term for an approach that claimed scientific authority vis-à-vis Ainu, who became its research objects. As a result of this legacy, a latent sense of suspicion still hangs over the purpose ... More

Keywords: Ainu lands, Japanese government, Indigenous people, UzawaKanako, Ainu activist, Ainu Studies, Ainu diaspora, Ainu society

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2013 Print ISBN-13: 9780824836979
Published to University Press Scholarship Online: November 2016 DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824836979.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Mark J. Hudson, editor
Nishikyushu University (University of West Kyushu)

Ann-Elise Lewallen, editor
University of California, Santa Barbara

Mark K. Watson, editor
Concordia University (Montreal)

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Contents

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1 Beyond Ainu Studies

Mark K. Watson, ann-elise lewallen, and Mark J. Hudson

Theme One Representation / Objectification

2 Ainu Ethnography

Hans Dieter Ölschleger

Theme Two New Critical Responses

5 Charanke

Uzawa Kanako

6 As a Child of Ainu

Sunazawa Kayo, foreword by ann-elise lewallen

Theme Three Academic Disciplines and Understandings of Ainu

9 Trade and the Paradigm Shift in Research on Ainu Hunting Practices

Deriha Kōji, translated by ann-elise lewallen

Theme Four The Discourse of Culturalism

10 Our Ancestors’ Handprints

Tsuda Nobuko, foreword and translation by ann-elise lewallen

11 The Gender of Cloth

ann-elise lewallen