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Since MeijiPerspectives on the Japanese Visual Arts, 1868-2000$
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J. Thomas Rimer

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780824834418

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824834418.001.0001

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date: 21 August 2017

Japanese Art Criticism

Japanese Art Criticism

The First Fifty Years

Chapter:
(p.257) 10 Japanese Art Criticism
Source:
Since Meiji
Author(s):

Mikiko Hirayama

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824834418.003.0011

This chapter examines the evolution of modern Japanese art criticism from the 1880s to the late 1930s, with particular emphasis on the discourse on yōga. It begins with a discussion of three categories of art criticism in Japan: “scientific,” “literary,” and “journalistic.” It then considers the rise of art criticism in Japanese mass media before turning to specialized art periodicals that began to emerge during the 1880s. It also explores “impressionistic criticism” by so-called dilettantes; the issue of jury selection for the Japanese exhibits at the Paris World Fair of 1900; alternative approaches to art criticism during the decade of 1910; the problems associated with “impressionistic criticism” and the call for “scientific criticism” in the 1930s; and the question of whether critics and artists should advocate the autonomy of art. The chapter concludes with an overview of art criticism under the New Order.

Keywords:   art criticism, yōga, Japan, mass media, art periodicals, impressionistic criticism, dilettantes, Paris World Fair, scientific criticism, autonomy of art

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