Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Repositioning the MissionaryRewriting the Histories of Colonialism, Native Catholicism, and Indigeneity in Guam$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Vicente M. Diaz

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780824834340

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824834340.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of
date: 19 August 2017

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.8) Introduction
Source:
Repositioning the Missionary
Author(s):

Vicente M. Diaz

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824834340.003.0009

The introductory chapter first sets out the book's purpose, which is to examine the multiple and competing cultural and political stakes in the historic and contemporary effort to canonize Diego Luis de San Vitores, the seventeenth-century founder of the glorious (or notorious) Spanish Catholic Church on Guam. Why have modern-day Chamorros revived the effort to canonize San Vitores? More pointedly, what does the effort tell us about highly political processes of indigenous cultural and identity construction and historical consciousness, particularly in highly colonized places like Guam? The chapter then highlights the story of indigenous Catholicism on a heavily colonized island. First it gives an overview of the island's political history, framed generally by the predicament of indigenous cultural survival through competing colonialisms. Next, it provides a shorter overview of the centrality of San Vitores' mission in this colonial legacy. Finally, it concludes with the other intellectual and political stakes in the Chamorro Catholic story, including the implications for critical scholarship forged in relation to Native Pacific studies, Pacific Area studies, and cultural studies.

Keywords:   Diego Luis de San Vitores, Spanish Jesuit missionary, Chamorros, Catholic Church, Guam

University Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .