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Haoles in Hawaii$
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Judy Rohrer

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780824834050

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824834050.001.0001

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date: 20 August 2017

Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.101) Conclusion
Source:
Haoles in Hawaii
Author(s):

Judy Rohrer

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824834050.003.0006

This concluding chapter summarizes key themes and presents some final thoughts. This book examined common haole responses to being marked as haole and challenged the haole tendency to try to slide out of haole by representing oneself as kama'āina, hapa, Hawaiian at heart, or even Hawaiian. It is disrespectful to try to escape the historical weight of haole by appropriating Kanaka Maoli culture. Moreover, loudly protesting the use of the word “haole” is about as haole as it gets. The book contested the growing discourse among haoles of haole victimization, especially through the portrayal of native Hawaiians as victimizers. By making themselves victims, haoles can neatly duck out of their responsibility for the consequences of colonialism. The chapter then addresses the following question: How can we inhabit haole differently?

Keywords:   haole, Hawaii, victimization, colonialism

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