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Kabuki's Forgotten War1931-1945$
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James R. Brandon

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780824832001

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824832001.001.0001

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date: 19 January 2018

Confrontation with America and Britain

Confrontation with America and Britain

1941

Chapter:
(p.156) Chapter Six Confrontation with America and Britain
Source:
Kabuki's Forgotten War
Author(s):

James R. Brandon

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824832001.003.0006

This chapter discusses events surrounding the world of kabuki in 1941. For instance, in January 1941, Ōtani Takejirō, writing as president of the Shōchiku Theatrical Corporation, president of the Producers' Association, and member of the Central Committee of the Imperial Rule Assistance Association, publicly pledged the theater world to follow the government's lead in creating a new wartime theater. Hereafter, he said, producers would stage only wholesome and cheerful entertainment that fits into the National Policy of the New Order. In December 22, in support for Japan's entry into the larger world war, the Shōchiku Company invited the German and Italian ambassadors and a score of their staff to see Kumagai's Battle Camp and other kabuki treasures at the Kabuki-za. Within days of the attack on Pearl Harbor and Southeast Asia, officials of the cabinet Bureau of Information summoned theater, film, and music producers to advise them that “amusement enterprises under … wartime stresses will not be suppressed but will be carefully guided.”

Keywords:   kabuki theater, independent kabuki troupes, New Order, World War II, Ōtani Takejirō

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