Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Body CountsThe Vietnam War and Militarized Refuge(es)$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Yen Le Espiritu

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780520277700

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520277700.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of
date: 21 November 2017

Refugee Remembering—and Remembrance

Refugee Remembering—and Remembrance

Chapter:
(p.105) 5 Refugee Remembering—and Remembrance
Source:
Body Counts
Author(s):

Yến Lê Espiritu

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520277700.003.0005

This chapter tells the Vietnamese refugee version of the “good refugee” story, in order to steer attention toward quotidian memory places—the places where ghosts reside. According to Avery Gordon, “The ghost or the apparition is the principal form by which something lost or invisible or seemingly not there makes itself known or apparent to us.” Thus, to write from this haunted position is to look for the living effects of what seems to be over and done with. As such, the ghost is important not as a dead figure but as a sign of what is missing—or, more accurately, of what has been disappeared. Since South Vietnamese history intersects, and not just coincides, with American nationalist history, recovering the ghosts of the former would simultaneously reveal those of the latter.

Keywords:   Vietnamese refugee, South Vietnam, American nationalist, quotidian memory, ghosts

University Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .