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Social Policy Review 19Analysis and debate in social policy, 2007$
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Karen Clarke, Tony Maltby, and Patricia Kennett

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9781861349415

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781861349415.001.0001

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date: 18 August 2017

Managing multiple life courses: the influence of children on migration processes in the European Union

Managing multiple life courses: the influence of children on migration processes in the European Union

Chapter:
(p.317) Fifteen Managing multiple life courses: the influence of children on migration processes in the European Union
Source:
Social Policy Review 19
Author(s):

Louise Ackers

Helen Stalford

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781861349415.003.0016

This chapter considers the impact of personal and family relationships and obligations on migration behaviour. The analysis seeks to add to debates that move beyond the ‘male breadwinner’ and economic rationality models of migration. Instead, it highlights the complexity and multiplicity of factors involved in the migration process, with a particular focus on the life course and the influence of children. The analysis draws on qualitative research carried out among highly skilled (science) professionals moving within the EU, with Bulgaria and Poland identified as ‘sending’ countries and the UK and Germany as two ‘destination’ countries. The chapter demonstrates that those who migrate with children are strongly influenced by their families' needs, particularly those of their children. However, the nature of these needs is not static but dynamic, and will vary over the life course, just as strategies and options for meeting these needs will change. The chapter highlights the importance of context for understanding the migration process, particularly in relation to domestic welfare regimes, access to and affordability of childcare provision, and education.

Keywords:   personal relationships, family relationships, migration behaviour, children, skilled labour, migrant labour, welfare regimes, childcare, education

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