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Modernising health careReinventing professions, the state and the public$
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Ellen Kuhlmann

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9781861348586

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781861348586.001.0001

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date: 22 August 2017

Towards ‘citizen professionals’: contextualising professions and the state

Towards ‘citizen professionals’: contextualising professions and the state

Chapter:
(p.15) One Towards ‘citizen professionals’: contextualising professions and the state
Source:
Modernising health care
Author(s):

Ellen Kuhlmann

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781861348586.003.0002

This chapter links the concept of citizenship as the superstructure of governance of welfare states to research on professions, and sets contemporary changes in historical context. New demands for the accountability of professions and participation of service users mirror shifts in the concept of citizenship towards social inclusion and participation. Professions are expected to exercise both the role of ‘officers’ and of ‘servants’ of welfare states. Linking citizenship as a symbol of modernity and professions provides a theoretical framework to highlight the transformability of professionalism and to assess the changing relationships between professions, the state and the public in the wake of new demands and modes of governance. This approach helps to overcome a binary logic of ‘countervailing powers’ between state, market and professions and brings the interdependence and tensions into view.

Keywords:   citizenship, welfare states, governance, professionalism, countervailing powers

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