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Social Policy Review 18Analysis and debate in social policy, 2006$
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Linda Bauld, Karen Clarke, and Tony Maltby

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9781861348449

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781861348449.001.0001

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date: 19 August 2017

Creating a patient-led NHS: empowering ‘consumers’ or shrinking the state?

Creating a patient-led NHS: empowering ‘consumers’ or shrinking the state?

Chapter:
(p.32) (p.33) Two Creating a patient-led NHS: empowering ‘consumers’ or shrinking the state?
Source:
Social Policy Review 18
Author(s):

Ruth McDonald

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781861348449.003.0002

This chapter discusses developments in health policy. It makes clear that individual choice has a number of different roles to play in healthcare. It explains that the introduction of patient choice combined with payment by results further extends the use of market mechanisms as the means for achieving quality, responsiveness and efficiency in hospital care. It concerns policy towards health care outside of hospitals, since, with regard to the NHS in England, the government is increasingly turning its attention to care beyond the hospital doors. It focuses wholly on the NHS in England, since devolution in Scotland and Wales has resulted in health policy developments that diverge somewhat from the English model. It describes policies intended to ‘fix’ the hospital sector and offers an explanation for the shift in attention beyond this sector. It also examines demand and supply-side policies.

Keywords:   health policy, patient choice, NHS in England, devolution, Scotland and Wales, hospital sector, demand and supply-side policies

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