Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Women and New LabourEngendering politics and policy?$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Claire Annesley, Francesca Gains, and Kirstein Rummery

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9781861348289

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781861348289.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of
date: 18 August 2017

Two steps forward, one step back: the gender dimensions of Treasury policy under New Labour

Two steps forward, one step back: the gender dimensions of Treasury policy under New Labour

Chapter:
(p.116) (p.117) Six Two steps forward, one step back: the gender dimensions of Treasury policy under New Labour
Source:
Women and New Labour
Author(s):

Coates David

Oettinger Sarah

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781861348289.003.0006

This chapter investigates the gender implications of New Labour's macro-economic policy. New Labour policy was bound to have a differential impact across the whole range of gender relationships in the UK, and was bound to do so whether that impact was consciously planned or not. New Labour's Treasury team was sensitive to at least some of those consequences from the very outset of its period in office. New Labour's initial macro-policy stance was focused more on the employment than the gender dimensions of this labour-market transformation. After nearly a decade of New Labour in power, only one full-time worker in five in the UK enjoys even vestigial access to a flexible working week.

Keywords:   New Labour, macro-economic policy, Treasury policy, employment, gender, labour market, UK

University Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .