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Community health and wellbeingAction research on health inequalities$
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Steve Cropper, Alison Porter, and Gareth Williams

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9781861348180

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781861348180.001.0001

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date: 23 August 2017

The role of the community-based action researcher

The role of the community-based action researcher

Chapter:
(p.128) (p.129) Six The role of the community-based action researcher
Source:
Community health and wellbeing
Author(s):

Martin O’Neill

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781861348180.003.0006

This chapter examines one particular way in which projects sought to engage communities in the action research process and discusses the role and experiences of community-based action researchers (CBARs). The analysis reveals that the Sustainable Health Action Research Programme (SHARP) projects which used the CBAR model found that it worked. The CBARs gave projects an entrée into communities and brought a very different perspective from that which would have been provided by traditional researchers. However, there are social risks and ethical issues in the CBAR model that need to be considered and properly addressed.

Keywords:   action research, communities, CBAR, SHARP projects, research, social risks, ethical issues

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