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Securing an urban renaissanceCrime, community, and British urban policy$
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Rowland Atkinson and Gesa Helms

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9781861348159

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781861348159.001.0001

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date: 20 August 2017

‘Problem’ people, ‘problem’ places? New Labour and council estates

‘Problem’ people, ‘problem’ places? New Labour and council estates

Chapter:
(p.125) Eight ‘Problem’ people, ‘problem’ places? New Labour and council estates
Source:
Securing an urban renaissance
Author(s):

Charlie Johnston

Gerry Mooney

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781861348159.003.0008

This chapter focuses on the construction and representation of council estates as problem places in Great Britain. It describes the preoccupation of the urban-renewal agenda with social-housing estates and the reproduction of inequalities and misery of poverty. The chapter argues that council estates play a symbolically and ideologically important role as a signifier and marker of social problems and spatialised dysfunctionality. It explains that in New Labour's much-heralded urban renaissance, the council estate is often counterposed against the vision of a revitalised urban citizenship in which responsible and orderly communities are involved in the management of their neighbourhoods.

Keywords:   council estates, problem places, Great Britain, urban renewal, inequalities, social problems, spatialised dysfunctionality, New Labour, urban renaissance, urban citizenship

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