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Families in societyBoundaries and relationships$
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Linda McKie and Sarah Cunningham-Burley

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9781861346438

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781861346438.001.0001

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date: 19 August 2017

Families, education and the ‘participatory imperative’

Families, education and the ‘participatory imperative’

Chapter:
(p.57) Four Families, education and the ‘participatory imperative’
Source:
Families in society
Author(s):

Janet Shucksmith

Lorna McKee

Helen Willmot

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781861346438.003.0004

This chapter takes up the boundary metaphor through an exploration of the relationships between families and education services. It explores the ‘push and pull’ around the boundaries between families and professional educators. The study involved 19 adult members of working-class families. Based on the study, this chapter considers how boundaries between school and home have shifted seemingly in respect of the school's power to dictate aspects of childrearing, domestic timetables and parenting practices. However, parents still reserved a space around the boundary where they felt free to demand appropriate standards of care and concern for their child; for example, on issues of bullying or healthcare. Boundaries between families and school have often been identified as crucial elements in educational and related social policies.

Keywords:   education services, working-class families, schooling, childrearing, bullying

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