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World povertyNew policies to defeat an old enemy$
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Peter Townsend and David Gordon

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9781861343956

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781861343956.001.0001

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date: 20 August 2017

The human condition is structurally unequal

The human condition is structurally unequal

Chapter:
(p.xi) Introduction The human condition is structurally unequal
Source:
World poverty
Author(s):

Peter Townsend

David Gordon

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781861343956.003.0001

This chapter describes the scope of the book. Three types of institutions (the richest governments, international agencies, and largest corporations) are prime instigators or sponsors of the policies that deepen, perpetuate, or aim to reduce existing poverty and inequality. The idea of these three ‘transforming’ the debate about poverty applies to the arguments they have put forward to reduce organised state welfare, progressive taxation, and employment rights, and to actively support privatisation. The scope of the book is international, and its focus is on anti-poverty policies rather than the scale, causes, and measurement of poverty. It is divided into four parts: international anti-poverty policies: the problems of the Washington Consensus; anti-poverty policies in rich countries; anti-poverty policies in poor countries; and future anti-poverty policies, both in national and international context.

Keywords:   poverty, state policy, inequality, progressive taxation, Washington Consensus, anti-poverty policies

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