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Children, risk and safety on the internetResearch and policy challenges in comparative perspective$
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Sonia Livingstone and Leslie Haddon

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9781847428837

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847428837.001.0001

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date: 20 August 2017

Understanding digital inequality: the interplay between parental socialisation and children's development

Understanding digital inequality: the interplay between parental socialisation and children's development

Chapter:
(p.257) Twenty Understanding digital inequality: the interplay between parental socialisation and children's development
Source:
Children, risk and safety on the internet
Author(s):

Ingrid Paus-Hasebrink

Cristina Ponte

Andrea Dürager

Joke Bauwens

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847428837.003.0020

Drawing on sociological and psychological theoretical perspectives, this chapter elaborates on two research questions. How does parents' formal education influence children's internet use? And how does children's development by age interact with their family background in terms of an autonomous and competent use of the internet? The interrelation between these two processes, parental socialisation and development by age, helps us understand the interplay of children's activities in dealing with the internet and their parents' handling of that. The chapter first discusses the persistent importance of social inequality for information and communications technology (ICT) use in the industrialised countries. It then elaborates on a theoretical framework by discussing both children and parents' individual agency and how these are interlinked with respect to their societal status. Finally, based on the EU Kids Online dataset, it tests out the theoretical ideas and hypotheses and ask how parental socialisation shapes young people's online competences, and how children's development by age interacts with structural processes and dynamics of socialisation. Children with a lower socio-economic background agree that they know more about the internet than their parents, as these children might acquire internet skills often independently from their parents.

Keywords:   Family background, Children's development, Socialisation processes, Internet use, Social economic status, Parental education

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