Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Social policy review 22Analysis and debate in social policy, 2010$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ian Greener, Chris Holden, and Majella Kilkey

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9781847427113

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847427113.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of
date: 13 December 2017

Service users as peer research interviewers: why bother?

Service users as peer research interviewers: why bother?

Chapter:
(p.317) Fourteen Service users as peer research interviewers: why bother?
Source:
Social policy review 22
Author(s):

Harding Rachel

Whitfield Grahame

Stillwell Neil

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847427113.003.0015

This chapter focuses specifically on service users' involvement as peer research interviewers. It points out that this approach, while part of a wider methodological commitment to challenging the objectification of service users within research, represents just one method of doing so, and is notably distinct from ‘user-led’ research. It draws on two studies undertaken within the social housing sector to outline the rationale, methods and ethics of peer interviewing, and to assess its strengths, as well as its risks. It argues that through this research approach, benefits can accrue to the peer interviewer, the service user being interviewed, and the ‘quality’ of the research process and data gathered. It suggests that the benefits associated with peer interviewing are contingent on the effective management of the risks involved. It provides useful guidance on how best to minimise risk and maximise the benefits of peer interviewing, while also advocating further evaluation of the research approach.

Keywords:   service users' involvement, peer research interviewers, user-led research, social housing sector, peer interviewing, research approach

University Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .