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Work, families and organisations in transitionEuropean perspectives$
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Suzan Lewis, Julia Brannen, and Ann Nilsen

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9781847422200

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847422200.001.0001

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date: 17 October 2017

Work—family policies in a contradictory culture: a Dutch financial sector corporation

Work—family policies in a contradictory culture: a Dutch financial sector corporation

Chapter:
(p.112) (p.113) Eight Work—family policies in a contradictory culture: a Dutch financial sector corporation
Source:
Work, families and organisations in transition
Author(s):

Bram Peper

Laura den Dulk

Anneke van Doorne-Huiskes

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847422200.003.0008

This chapter describes the context in the Netherlands where current public policy defines the work-family ‘balance’ as a shared responsibility between government, employees and employers. However, assumptions about gendered responsibilities remain rather traditional. Drawing on a case study of a Dutch finance company, the chapter describes an organisation that adopts several formal supportive policies and experiences many tensions. It shows how work-family policies play out in paradoxical and ambivalent ways in the organisation at different levels, and the consequences for working parents and their managers. The chapter argues that although employers recognise and acknowledge that work-family policies and supports make sense in the changing economic environments and are intended to enhance employee satisfaction, in practice these policies do not feature in senior management strategic business planning and hence, are not included in the organisational culture. As a result, workers do not feel entitle to take advantage of them.

Keywords:   Netherlands, public policy, work-family balance, shared responsibility, gendered responsibilities, Dutch finance company, work-family policies

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