Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Managing transitionsSupport for individuals at key points of change$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Alison Petch

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9781847421883

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847421883.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of
date: 17 August 2017

Young people leaving care: transitions to adulthood

Young people leaving care: transitions to adulthood

Chapter:
(p.25) Three Young people leaving care: transitions to adulthood
Source:
Managing transitions
Author(s):

Mike Stein

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847421883.003.0003

After providing an overview of young people in the United Kingdom who leave foster care and residential care, this chapter highlights the importance of understanding their transition as part of their broader lifecourse and as ‘fast tracked’ compared to their peers in the wider community. It identifies three main experiences of transition: those who successfully move on; those who ‘survive’, often as a result of the personal and professional support they receive; and those for whom past experiences are already damaging and future life chances are poor. The chapter discusses research findings showing that young people leaving care, as a group, are likely to have a difficult transition to adulthood. As a group, these young care leavers have a high risk of social exclusion, but there are differences in their outcomes, between those who successfully ‘move on’, those who ‘survive’, and those who ‘struggle’.

Keywords:   United Kingdom, transitions, young people, adulthood, foster care, residential care, care leavers, lifecourse, social exclusion, outcomes

University Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .