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Children, politics and communicationParticipation at the margins$
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Nigel Thomas

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9781847421845

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847421845.001.0001

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date: 23 August 2017

Closings in young children’s disputes: resolution, dissipation and teacher intervention

Closings in young children’s disputes: resolution, dissipation and teacher intervention

Chapter:
(p.145) Eight Closings in young children’s disputes: resolution, dissipation and teacher intervention
Source:
Children, politics and communication
Author(s):

Amelia Church

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847421845.003.0009

This chapter shows how the methods of conversation analysis can help to understand processes of conflict between young children. It reveals that examples of spontaneous arguments between four-year old children, despite conflict not always being resolved, show that one can distinguish three possible outcomes in children's disputes: resolution, abandonment, and teacher intervention. It notes that close analysis of these three dispute ‘closings’ reveals that very specific linguistic resources are used by young children to manage disagreements with peers. It exemplifies children's competencies in social interaction and demonstrates that close attention to features of talk-in-interaction affords a rich understanding of children's social worlds. It draws attention to some specific ways in which young children develop communicative repertoires and strategies to get noticed, achieve their objectives, and manage different situations.

Keywords:   conversation analysis, conflict, spontaneous arguments, resolution, abandonment, teacher intervention, dispute closings, talk-in-interaction

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