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Tackling prison overcrowdingBuild more prisons? Sentence fewer offenders?$
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Mike Hough, Rob Allen, and Enver Solomon

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9781847421104

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847421104.001.0001

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date: 22 August 2017

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Introduction
Source:
Tackling prison overcrowding
Author(s):

Mike Hough

Enver Solomon

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847421104.003.0001

This book is composed of the proceedings of the symposium held in May 2008 that examined the government policy on prisons and imprisonment. This event was organised by the three research centres in the School of Law at King's College London: the Institute of Criminal Policy Research, the Centre for Crime and Justice Studies, and the International Centre for Prison Studies. The symposium examined the latest proposals for prisons and sentencing that were emphasised by Lord Carter in his government's review of prisons. This report, which was published in December 2007, put forward radical recommendations such as the creation of a sentencing commission and the construction of large-scale ‘Titan’ prisons. Cognizant of the significance of these proposals, the three centres in King' College hence organised a symposium that aimed to contribute to the government deliberations on the proposals in the Carter Report. This book sums up the revised presentations of the symposium. It includes a chapter that looks at the future strategies based on Professor Rod Morgan's concluding comments at the seminar. The book also includes an endnote that discusses the current issues on sentencing, prison overcrowding, and imprisonment.

Keywords:   government policy, prisons, imprisonment, sentencing, Lord Carter, Carter Report, prison overcrowding

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